Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Movie Review of Joe Chappelle's Political Thriller An Acceptable Loss with Jamie Lee Curtis and Tika Sumpter: Tension and Surprising Plot Twists Keep You Watching Till the Very End


Review by Connor Moriarty

An Acceptable Loss (2018) is a political thriller with an intriguingly ambitious execution. Tika Sumpter (Ride Along. Nobody’s Fool), Ben Tavassoli (Overlord), and Jamie Lee Curtis (Halloween ’78, Halloween ’18) all turn in strong performances in their respective roles and Writer/Director Joe Chappelle (Chicago Fire, The Wire) crafts a timely, thrilling, and emotional story.

Political thrillers a-la Body of Lies (2008) and The Ides of March (2011), tend to bite off more plot devices and elements than they can chew. An Acceptable Loss gains a lot of ground in its innate sense of urgency. Right off the bat, there’s an undeniably frightening tension between the two leads, Martin (Tavassoli) and Libby (Sumpter).

Friday, January 11, 2019

New York Filmmaker and Musician David Patrick Wilson Releases Country Song Pickup Truck


David Patrick Wilson is a filmmaker out of New York that just released a new song. His last film, Collar the Movie, available on Amazon stars Tom Sizemore and Rebecca DeMornay. Now he is turning to his musical roots with a new country song just released but with more in the works.  

Tell me what prompted you to do this. Have you done anything similar in the past?

David P Wilson: I had a pickup truck that my Uncle left me when he passed and I was staying at his place in Long Island.  I went to visit my mom upstate NY in Sullivan County and I took her dog, "Shadow" on a ride in the pick-up.  I had such fun with him on that ride that I wrote the song on the way back to Long Island.  I had never done anything like that before, mostly because my mother hated country music, which I love.  I have written a lot of music of all different kinds, but that was my first foray into country music.

Monday, January 7, 2019

MOVIE REVIEW: Angie Thomas' The Hate U Give is A Must-Watch - Masterfully Created and Acted, Personal and Human - A Story to Make Us Think, and Maybe Act


Review by Emily Galow

"This movie is masterfully crafted and acted, and more than that, it tells the story of a teenage girl, in all of her messiness, in all of her humanity, and the journey she undergoes to find her voice and use it. The Hate U give is personal."

When you hear the words “movie adapted from a YA novel,” certain tropes and images may spring to mind: dazzlingly attractive 25 year-olds playing teenagers, a vaguely evil futuristic dystopia that demands conformity above all else, a special white girl rebelling against the dystopia with a ragtag group of freedom fighters.

Here’s the plot of Angie Thomas’s The Hate U Give, adapted into the movie directed by George Tillman: Teenage Starr Carter is the only witness in her childhood best friend Khalil’s murder at the hands of a police officer, and she has to decide whether to testify on his behalf in the trial to come. Here’s the first scene in The Hate U Give: when they were little kids, Starr’s father, played with fierce love by Russell Hornsby, gives Starr (Amandla Stenberg), her older brother Seven (Lamar Johnson) and her little brother Sekani (TJ Wright) The Talk black families give to their children on what to do when an officer approaches you or pulls you over. “Put your hands on the dashboard,” Maverick tells his wide-eyed children, “Don’t make any sudden moves.” 

Friday, January 4, 2019

Intervew with DriverX Film Producer Mark Stolaroff: Secrets to Making a Micro-Budget Movie, Working with Patrick Fabian and What He Learned Making This Movie - Prioritize, Find a Cast Who Cares Plus More Tips

Interview by Suzanne Ordas Curry

It's not easy to make a film these days. It's not easy to make a good film these days. And it's even harder to make a HIT film on a limited budget. But Mark Stolaroff knows a few secrets, some secrets any new filmmaker could learn from. His latest film, DriverX, written by Henry Barrial and starring Better Call Saul's Patrick Fabian is now in theaters and on-demand, all over the place. It's a success story of an indie securing distribution from a great company - IFC films, winning awards and making money. Driver X is the story, insprired by the writer's true experiences, of a middle-aged man who after exploring other job opportunities after his record business fails (no suprise there) and ends up as an Uber-type service driver. It's funny and enlightening, with a great cast. We speak to Mark about the genesis and production of this film.

BTS: Tell me about how DriverX came to be, how you got involved in it.